Border Crossing Information - Lake Superior Circle Tour
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Border Crossing Information

To travel the Lake Superior Circle Tour you will need to cross the Canadian and American international border two times. In order to cross the border you will need a valid passport or other acceptable documentation which will be reviewed later on this page. For specific border crossing information for entering Canada see the information below Crossing the Border Into Canada. If you’re looking for border crossing information for entering the U.S.A see the information below Crossing the Border Into the U.S.A.

Covid-19: Current Border Measures

Americans can now enter Canada provided they’ve been fully vaccinated with a Health Canada-approved COVID-19 vaccine 14 days before crossing the border. They must submit their travel information and vaccination documents using the ArriveCAN app or by registering online within 72 hours before their arrival.

Canadians can enter the United States by air, but can’t cross a land border for non-essential travel at this time.

For more information regarding COVID-19 border regulations we recommend visiting www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca for Canada and www.cdp.gov for the USA.

  • 1. Crossing the Border Into Canada

    All U.S. citizens aged 16 and older, entering Canada by air (including in-transit passengers who are transferring planes in the U.S.), land or water, must present one of the following documents: a passport or passport card; an Enhanced Driver’s License; or a Trusted Traveler Program Card (SENTRI, NEXUS or FAST Card). Travelers aged 15 and under require a birth certificate for land or sea travel and a passport for air travel. For current requirements go to: cic.gc.ca.

    If you are traveling with your own children under the age of 16 and your spouse, bring their birth certificates. If you are traveling with a child other than your own or without your spouse, have the child’s birth certificate along with a letter of permission, including name and contact information for that child’s parents/guardians or your spouse. This is needed in case Customs officers decide to verify you have permission to bring the child into Canada.

    Visitors from all other countries require a valid passport and, in some cases, a visitor’s visa. Starting March 15, 2016, visa-exempt foreign nationals who fly to or transit through Canada  need to have an Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA). Exceptions include U.S. citizens and travellers with a valid visa. For more border crossing information:

    Canada Border Services Agency

    cbsa.gc.ca

    Within Canada: 1-800-461-9999
    TTY Within Canada: 1-866-335-3237
    Outside of Canada: 204-983-3500

    What Can and Can’t Come into Canada

    Residents of the United States who visit Canada are allowed to bring in a “reasonable” amount of personal goods duty free. The amount you bring should align with your length of stay. Limits for some of the regulated items:

    Alcohol

    If you are 19 years of age or older and crossing the border into Ontario, you can bring, free of duty and taxes, either 1.5 litres (50 oz.) of wine, 1.14 litres (40 oz.) of liquor, or 24 X 355 millilitres (12 oz.) of beer or ale. If you bring in more than the amount listed here, you will be required to pay the duty at the Border on excess amounts. Make sure you fully declare all alcohol in your possession. When the visit is for less than 24 hours, quantities may be reduced.

    Tobacco

    If you are 19 years of age or older and crossing the border into Ontario, you are allowed to bring, free of duty, up to 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars, 200 grams (7 oz.) of manufactured tobacco and 200 tobacco sticks. You may bring additional quantities but you will be required to pay duties and taxes on the excess amounts.

    Food Products

    What is and what is not allowed changes frequently. Visit www.inspection.gc.ca for current information prior to your departure.

    Pets

    Dogs and cats accompanying their owners from the U.S. must have current (within 36 months) rabies vaccination certificates. Owners from other countries who wish to bring their pets with them should contact 1-800-442-2342 / / TTY 1-800-465-7735 or visit inspection.gc.ca

    Residents Returning to the U.S.A

    If you’re a U.S. resident visiting Canada for less than 48 hours, you can bring back $200 worth of goods duty-free. For stays longer than 48 hours, the duty-free limit rises to $800, but this $800 limit can only be used once every 30 days. If you return for another shopping trip in less than 30 days and have already purchased $800 worth of goods, your limit drops to $200. People who live in the same house can combine their duty-free limits, but they must travel together. Refer to https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/246/~/duty–free-exemption

    Additional Information for Visiting Canada

    Driving and Insurance

    Any necessary permits are issued at the port of entry. If you’ve rented a vehicle or trailer, make sure you bring along a copy of the rental contract, which stipulates that you have permission to use it in Canada. U.S. motorists planning to travel in Canada are advised to obtain a Canadian Non-Resident Interprovincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card available only in the U.S.  Contact your local insurance agency. For more information contact Canadian Border Services (204) 983-3500, or (506) 636-5064, or visit the website at www.cbsa.gc.ca

    Note that in Ontario use of cellular and other devices is hands-free. https://www.ontario.ca/page/distracted-driving Use of transportation of radar warning devices is illegal.

    Speed limits are posted in kilometres and Ontario Law requires that adults and children over 40lbs/18kg in weight wear seat belts. Infants from birth to 20lbs/9kg in weight must travel in a rear-facing child restraint system. Toddlers weighing 20-40lbs /9-18kg must travel in a front-facing child restraint seat.

    Hospitals and Healthy Insurance

    Most communities have hospitals and/or resident doctors. Wise travelers will check with their medical service plans to ensure they will be covered while in Canada, as health insurance plan may not extend coverage outside your country of residence. If you are taking prescription drugs, make sure that they are in the original packaging, bring an adequate supply, and bring a copy of the prescription in case you need a refill during your stay in Ontario. If this is not possible, carry a copy of the prescription or a letter from your doctor. For more information and insurance details, contact your travel agent, insurance broker, or your employer’s insurance provider.

    Credit Cards, Financial Services, and U.S Funds

    Chartered banks are located in virtually all cities and towns. These full-service institutions are the best locations for exchanging currency. There is also a government sanctioned Canada / U.S. currency exchange service at the Ontario Travel Information Centre in Sault Ste. Marie and at the Duty Free Store & Kiosk. Credit cards such as Visa, MasterCard and AMEX, are generally honored in all communities. Be sure to check with individual businesses before or when booking accommodations to ensure they accept your type of card.

    Sales Tax

    In Ontario, a Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) of 13% applies to most purchases.

    Liquor Outlets and the Law

    You must be 19 or over to buy or consume liquor, wine and beer in Ontario. It is an offence to consume alcohol anywhere other than in a licensed establishment, your residence or within a reasonable distance of your residence. Ontario laws prohibit having open bottles of liquor in a location accessible to the driver of a vehicle. Please don’t drink and drive! Liquor including wine and beer is available through stores run by the Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) or in smaller centers, by their authorized representative. Beer may be purchased through “The Beer Store” or directly from brewery outlets.  Beer, wine and cider is now available at select grocery stores in the province of Ontario.

    Drinking hours in licensed establishments are from 11 a.m. until 2 a.m. In Ontario, it is an offence to consume alcohol anywhere other than in a residence or on licensed premises. Please note that driving motorized vehicles, including cars, trucks, All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs), snowmobiles, and boats, while impaired is illegal. You can immediately lose your license for 90 days for refusing to take a breathalyzer reading greater than 80 mg (0.08%) of alcohol per 100 mL of blood. Charges may be laid under the criminal code of Canada.

    Marijuana/Cannabis

    Cannabis is legal for adults in Canada. However, it is still illegal to transport cannabis and products containing cannabis – including edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals – across the Canadian border:

    No matter how much cannabis you have with you

    Even if you are authorized to use cannabis for medical purposes in any form, including cannabidiol (CBD)

    Even if you are travelling to or from a municipality, state or country where cannabis has been legalized or decriminalized

    If you are entering Canada and have cannabis with you in any form, you must declare it to the Canada Border Services Agency.

    Not declaring cannabis in your possession at the Canadian border is a serious criminal offence. You could be arrested and prosecuted.

    It is illegal to take cannabis across the Canadian border, whether you are entering or leaving the country. You could be charged with a criminal offence if you try to travel to other countries with any amount of cannabis in your possession. This applies to all countries, whether cannabis is legal there or not.

    Cannabis is illegal in most countries. If you try to travel internationally with any amount of cannabis in your possession, you could face serious criminal penalties both at home and abroad. You could be denied entry at your destination country if you have previously used cannabis or any substance prohibited by local laws. You could also be denied entry to other countries in the future.

    It is your responsibility to learn about the laws, including the legal status of cannabis use and possession, in your destination country. See our Travel Advice and Advisories for more information.

    Boaters – How to Report your Entry

    Pleasure crafts may enter Canada by trailer or under their own power. All boats powered by motors 10 HP or over must be licensed. Boat licenses from outside Ontario are accepted. Operator Competency Requirements for Pleasure Craft – Regulation requires that all operators of motorized pleasure crafts have proof of competency and proof of age on board at all times. An operator card or equivalent, issued to a non-resident by their state or country, will be considered as proof of competency. For information visit www.safeboater.com

    Planning to “land” your vessel on Canadian soil or did you leave Canadian waters and land on U.S. soil? All private boaters who intend to land on Canadian soil, or who have departed Canadian waters and landed on U.S. soil, are required to report to a CBSA designated marine reporting site. Upon arrival at this designated site, call the Telephone Reporting Centre at 1-888-226-7277 from the phone provided to obtain clearance. Not planning to “land” your vessel or did you leave Canadian waters but did not land on U.S. soil? You still need to report to the CBSA. Certain private boaters may contact the CBSA by calling the TRC at 1-888-226-7277.  For more detailed information, visit www.cbsa.gc.ca/media/facts-faits/096-eng.html

    Firearms Information

    Residents of the U.S. over the age of 18 may bring a hunting rifle or shotgun into Ontario for hunting purposes. You are also allowed to bring up to 200 rounds of ammunition duty free, or up to 1,500 rounds for use at a recognized competition. Firearms are subject to a registration fee. It is suggested that you contact the Canada Firearms Centre For information before you attempt to import a firearm.

    Residents of the U.S. are encouraged to pre-register their firearms prior arriving. Handguns, fully automatic weapons, modified weapons, stun guns, mace and other weapons are not allowed in Canada. Proper storage of the firearm is important so make sure you are aware of the regulations. Of special note, firearms of any kind are forbidden in many of Canada’s National and Provincial Parks and adjacent areas.

    For more information on importing your firearm into Canada and to receive a registration form, please contact the Canadian Firearms Centre at 800-731-4000 or 506-624-5380.

    Disclaimer

    We make every effort to ensure accuracy of the information published but cannot be held responsible for the information provided herein. The border crossing information contained on this page is offered to you as a matter of interest and is believed to be correct and accurate at the time of printing. The producers of this publication accept no liability for errors or omissions.

  • 2. Crossing the Border into the U.S.A

    All Canadian and U.S. citizens entering the United States by land are required to present one of the following valid WHTI-compliant documents: a passport, a NEXUS card; a FAST card; or an EDL or EIC from a province or territory where a U.S. approved EDL/EIC program has been implemented. For more border crossing information:

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    cbp.gov
    Within the U.S.: 1-877-CBP-5511(227-5511)
    TTY Within the U.S.: 1-866-6582 1-800-877-8339
    Outside of the U.S.: 202-325-8000
    Grand Portage, MN Port of Entry: 218-475-2244

    What Can and Can’t Come into Canada

    Residents of Canada who visit the U.S.A are allowed to bring in a “reasonable” amount of personal goods duty free. The amount you bring should align with your length of stay. Limits for some of the regulated items:

    Alcohol

    Generally, one liter of alcohol per person may be entered into the U.S. duty-free by travelers who are 21 or older. Additional quantities may be entered, although they will be subject to duty and Federal excise taxes, which will be assessed and collected at the Port of Entry. Alcoholic beverages purchased in duty-free shops are subject to duty and Federal Excise Tax when accompanying you into the United States. It is illegal for travelers under the age of 21 to import alcohol – even as a gift.

    State laws and regulations vary widely from state to state, and may be more restrictive than federal regulations. States often have restrictions on the amount of alcohol that can be brought in that applies only to the residence of that State. Generally, people transiting through a state are not subject to those restrictions, but sometimes regulations change. You can check with the Alcohol Beverage Control Board of that state to find out what their policies are.

    Tobacco

    You are permitted to bring 100 cigars or 200 cigarettes (one carton) into the US duty free, or one roll (“stock”) of snuff into the US duty free.

    Food Products

    Many agriculture products are prohibited entry into the United States from certain countries because they may carry plant pests and foreign animal diseases.  All agriculture items must be declared and are subject to inspection by a CBP Agriculture Specialist at ports of entry to ensure they are free of plant pests and foreign animal diseases. Prohibited or restricted items may include meats, fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, seeds, soil and products made from animal or plant materials.  For generally allowed food items please visit USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    Pets

    All dogs must appear healthy to enter the United States. And depending upon what country the dogs are coming from, they may need a valid rabies vaccination certificate. Written or oral statements and any documents must be in English or have an English translation.

    The rules for bringing your dog into the United States are covered under US Regulations (see Rabies vaccine certificate required when coming from these countries below).

    These rules apply to all dogs, including puppies, service animals, and emotional support dogs. These rules also apply whether you are (1) just visiting the United States with your dog, (2) importing dogs into the United States, or (3) traveling out of the United States and returning with your dog after a temporary visit, such as a vacation or holiday, or for shopping or visiting friends and relatives.

    A general certificate of health is not required by CDC for entry of pet cats into the United States, although some airlines or states may require them. However, pet cats are subject to inspection at ports of entry and may be denied entry into the United States if they have evidence of an infectious disease that can be transmitted to humans. If a cat appears to be ill, further examination by a licensed veterinarian at the owner’s expense might be required at the port of entry.

    Cats are not required to have proof of rabies vaccination for importation into the United States. However, some states require vaccination of cats for rabies, so it is a good idea to check with state and local health authorities at your final destination.

    Marijuana/Cannabis

    Although the possession of cannabis is legal in some U.S. states, it remains illegal under U.S. federal laws. Do not attempt to cross the Canada-U.S. border with any amount of cannabis in any form, even if you are travelling to a U.S. state that has legalized possession of cannabis.

    Previous use of cannabis, or any substance prohibited by U.S. federal laws, could mean that you are denied entry to the U.S. If you are travelling for business related to the cannabis industry, you may be deemed inadmissible.

    Residents Returning to Canada

    If you’re a Canadian resident visiting the U.S.A for 24 hours or more you can claim goods up to CAN$200 without paying any duty and taxes. For those visiting for 48 hours or more the amount increases to CAN$800 without paying any duty and taxes.

    If you exceed your personal exemption after a trip of 48 hours or longer outside Canada you will be charged a special duty rate of 7% on the next CAN$300-worth of goods. The rate applies only to goods that accompany you and does not apply to tobacco products or alcoholic beverages. You still have to pay any Goods and Services Tax (GST) or Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) that applies. In some provinces, the CBSA also collects the provincial sales tax.

    Disclaimer

    We make every effort to ensure accuracy of the information published but cannot be held responsible for the information provided herein. The border crossing information contained on this page is offered to you as a matter of interest and is believed to be correct and accurate at the time of printing. The producers of this publication accept no liability for errors or omissions.

Canada and US Border Crossing FAQs


  • Do i need a passport to do the Lake Superior Circle Tour?

    A valid passport if often needed to complete the Lake Superior Circle Tour. However, alternative details and information can be found below.

    US Citizens

    US citizens aged 16 and older, entering Canada by air, land or water, must present one of the following documents:

    A passport or passport card

    An Enhanced Driver’s License

    Or a Trusted Traveler Program Card (SENTRI, NEXUS or FAST Card)

    US Travelers aged 15 and under require a birth certificate for land or sea and a passport for air travel.

    Canadian Citizens

    Canadian citizens traveling to the U.S. by land or sea are required to present one of the travel documents listed below, and may generally visit the U.S. for up to six months.

    Canadian passport

    Enhanced Driver’s License/Enhanced Identification Card

    NEXUS, FAST/EXPRES and SENTRI enrollment cards

  • Can I enter Canada with a DWI?

    If you or anyone your traveling with has a felony or misdemeanor conviction, you may be denied access into Canada. This includes such offences as a DWI/DUI (Driving While Impaired/Driving Under the Influence). Your admissibility into the country will depend on the nature of the offence, how many offences you have, as well as how long ago it occurred. If this applies to you or someone traveling with you, it is advised that you contact Immigration Canada well in advance of your travel. You may have to complete some paperwork and Immigration Canada authorities will then advise you of the likelihood of being allowed into Canada. Final determination of your entry into Canada is only made when you cross the border.

  • Can i Bring a Firearm into Canada?

    Residents of the U.S. over the age of 18 may bring a hunting rifle or shotgun into Ontario for hunting purposes. You are also allowed to bring up to 200 rounds of ammunition duty free, or up to 1,500 rounds for use at a recognized competition. Firearms are subject to a registration fee. It is suggested that you contact the Canada Firearms Center For information before you attempt to import a firearm. Residents of the U.S. are encouraged to preregister their firearms prior arriving.

    Handguns, fully automatic weapons, modified weapons, stun guns, mace and other weapons are not allowed in Canada. Proper storage of the firearm is important so make sure you are aware of the regulations. Of special note, firearms of any kind are forbidden in many of Canada’s National and Provincial Parks and adjacent areas. For more information on importing your firearm into Canada and to receive a registration form, please contact the Canadian Firearms Center at 800-731-4000 or 506-624-5380.

  • Can I bring prescription medication across the border?

    If you are taking prescription drugs, make sure that they are in the original packaging, bring an adequate supply, and bring a copy of the prescription in case you need a refill during your stay in Ontario. If this is not possible, carry a copy of the prescription or a letter from your doctor. For more information and insurance details, contact your travel agent, insurance broker, or your employer’s insurance provider.

  • How do i enter Canada by boat?

    Pleasure crafts may enter Canada by trailer or under their own power. All boats powered by motors 10 HP or over must be licensed. Boat licenses from outside Ontario are accepted. Operator Competency Requirements for Pleasure Craft – Regulation requires that all operators of motorized pleasure crafts have proof of competency and proof of age on board at all times. An operator card or equivalent, issued to a non-resident by their state or country, will be considered as proof of competency.

    Planning to “land” your vessel on Canadian soil or did you leave Canadian waters and land on U.S. soil? All private boaters who intend to land on Canadian soil, or who have departed Canadian waters and landed on U.S. soil, are required to report to a CBSA designated marine reporting site. Upon arrival at this designated site, call the Telephone Reporting Centre at 1- 888-226-7277 from the phone provided to obtain clearance. Not planning to “land” your vessel or did you leave Canadian waters but did not land on U.S. soil? You still need to report to the CBSA. Certain private boaters may contact the CBSA by calling the TRC at 1-888-226-7277.

  • How do I enter the U.S.A by boat?

    Operators of small pleasure vessels, arriving in the United States from a foreign port or place to include any vessel which has visited a hovering vessel or received merchandise outside the territorial sea, are required to report their arrival to CBP immediately.

    For more detailed information on entering the US by boat visit the U.S Customs and Border Protection website.

  • How much fuel can I bring across the border?

    Americans visiting Canada, and Canadians visiting the US, can bring an amount of fuel that could be “deemed reasonable” for use while visiting. The final decision on what amount if deemed reasonable will be made by the border officer. They will take things into consideration such as your length of stay and what you have with you that requires the fuel.

  • Can I tow more than one item?

    Yes. You can tow up two recreational items. However, the regulations can slightly change between Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Ontario. It is advised to contact the appropriate government agencies in each state/province prior to travel to ensure your compliance with each of their laws.

    Michigan

    Michigan towing law (Section 721 of the Michigan Vehicle Code) provides properly equipped pickup trucks to tow “recreational doubles.” This term refers to a pickup truck pulling a fifth-wheel trailer, designed for recreational living purposes, with a second trailer attached to the rear of the fifth-wheel trailer. The pickup truck must have a towing rating equal to, or greater than the weight of the trailers it is towing.

    Wisconsin

    Select 3-vehicle trains including combinations of horse or camper trailers, boats and recreational vehicle trailers are permitted to be operated without a permit from the DMV as long as they meet specified vehicle type, equipment, length, weight and operating conditions specified in Wisconsin Statute 348.08.

    Ontario

    In Ontario cars, passenger vans and SUVs are not permitted to tow more than one trailer or one vehicle. Motor homes, trucks, pickup trucks and truck campers are legally permitted to tow two trailers or a trailer and a motor vehicle behind a trailer. However, a three vehicle combination that is swaying excessively, is unstable or has reduced handling capabilities is subject to action by the police as an unsafe combination of vehicles under the Highway Traffic Act. The maximum length of any combination of vehicles is 23 m (75′ 6″).

  • How long can I stay in Canada/USA?

    An American citizen visiting Canada can stay in Canada for up to 6 months and not a day longer.

    A Canadian visiting the U.S can stay in the U.S for up to 6 months and not a day longer.

  • Can I bring my pet into Canada?

    Dogs and cats accompanying their owners from the U.S. must have current (within 36 months) rabies vaccination certificates. Owners from other countries who wish to bring their pets with them should contact 1-800-442-2342 / / TTY 1-800-465-7735 or visit inspection.gc.ca

  • Can I bring my pet into the US?

    All dogs must appear healthy to enter the United States. And depending upon what country the dogs are coming from, they may need a valid rabies vaccination certificate. Written or oral statements and any documents must be in English or have an English translation.

    The rules for bringing your dog into the United States are covered under US Regulations (see Rabies vaccine certificate required when coming from these countries below).

    These rules apply to all dogs, including puppies, service animals, and emotional support dogs. These rules also apply whether you are (1) just visiting the United States with your dog, (2) importing dogs into the United States, or (3) traveling out of the United States and returning with your dog after a temporary visit, such as a vacation or holiday, or for shopping or visiting friends and relatives.

    A general certificate of health is not required by CDC for entry of pet cats into the United States, although some airlines or states may require them. However, pet cats are subject to inspection at ports of entry and may be denied entry into the United States if they have evidence of an infectious disease that can be transmitted to humans. If a cat appears to be ill, further examination by a licensed veterinarian at the owner’s expense might be required at the port of entry.

    Cats are not required to have proof of rabies vaccination for importation into the United States. However, some states require vaccination of cats for rabies, so it is a good idea to check with state and local health authorities at your final destination.

  • What can I bring back into the US after visiting Canada?

    If you’re a U.S. resident visiting Canada for less than 48 hours, you can bring back $200 worth of goods duty-free. For stays longer than 48 hours, the duty-free limit rises to $800, but this $800 limit can only be used once every 30 days. If you return for another shopping trip in less than 30 days and have already purchased $800 worth of goods, your limit drops to $200. People who live in the same house can combine their duty-free limits, but they must travel together. Refer to https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/detail/a_id/246/~/duty–free-exemption

  • What can I bring back into Canada after visiting the US?

    If you’re a Canadian resident visiting the U.S.A for 24 hours or more you can claim goods up to CAN$200 without paying any duty and taxes. For those visiting for 48 hours or more the amount increases to CAN$800 without paying any duty and taxes.

    If you exceed your personal exemption after a trip of 48 hours or longer outside Canada you will be charged a special duty rate of 7% on the next CAN$300-worth of goods. The rate applies only to goods that accompany you and does not apply to tobacco products or alcoholic beverages. You still have to pay any Goods and Services Tax (GST) or Harmonized Sales Tax (HST) that applies. In some provinces, the CBSA also collects the provincial sales tax.

  • Can I bring amethyst from Canada into the US?

    Yes you can bring Amethyst from Canada into the US as long as it was purchased from a store or mine in Canada. The amethyst must have been purchased and will need to be claimed when crossing the boarder along with your other purchases.

  • Can I bring Firewood across the border?

    No. Firewood is not permitted across the border in either direction and should be purchased on the side of the border you intend to burn it on.

  • Can I bring food into Canada from the US?

    What is and what is not allowed changes frequently. Visit www.inspection.gc.ca for current information prior to your departure. However, fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, and uncooked meat are often not allowed entry into Canada.

  • Can I bring food into the US from Canada?

    Many agriculture products are prohibited entry into the United States from certain countries because they may carry plant pests and foreign animal diseases.  All agriculture items must be declared and are subject to inspection by a CBP Agriculture Specialist at ports of entry to ensure they are free of plant pests and foreign animal diseases. Prohibited or restricted items may include meats, fresh fruits and vegetables, plants, seeds, soil and products made from animal or plant materials.  For generally allowed food items please visit USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

  • What do I need to know about Marijuana and the border?

    Cannabis is legal for adults in Canada. However, it is still illegal to transport cannabis and products containing cannabis – including edible cannabis, cannabis extracts and cannabis topicals – across the Canadian border:

    -No matter how much cannabis you have with you

    -Even if you are authorized to use cannabis for medical purposes in any form, including cannabidiol (CBD)

    -Even if you are travelling to or from a municipality, state or country where cannabis has been legalized or decriminalized

    Although the possession of cannabis is legal in some U.S. states, it remains illegal under U.S. federal laws. Do not attempt to cross the Canada-U.S. border with any amount of cannabis in any form, even if you are travelling to a U.S. state that has legalized possession of cannabis.

    Previous use of cannabis, or any substance prohibited by U.S. federal laws, could mean that you are denied entry to the U.S. If you are travelling for business related to the cannabis industry, you may be deemed inadmissible.

  • If traveling by motorcycle do I need to wear a helmet?

    While riding in Ontario you must wear a helmet. You only need to wear a helmet in Michigan if you are under the age of 21 and in Wisconsin and Minnesota if you are under the age of 18. For more information on traveling the Lake Superior Circle Tour by motorcycle we recommend visiting our Lake Superior Circle Tour Motorcycle page.

    If you attempt to cross the Canadian border into Ontario without a helmet in your possession you will be denied entry. It is advisable to have a helmet on prior to arriving at the Canadian border. You will have to remove your helmet while talking to the border guards.

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